Journals and news

30
Jul
2011

Cyberbully Protection

Source:
04
Jul
2011

Quaky Cat by Diana Noonan (PDF 244KB)

Source: Radio NZ

New Zealand children's author, Diana Noonan, wrote the book, Quaky Cat, following the September 2010 Canterbury earthquake in New Zealand. The book aims to bring comfort to those who experienced the earthquake and understanding to those who didn't, by telling the story of a cat who experiences the earthquake. The book has been published by Scholastic NZ - click here to read further information about the book.

Qauky Cat has also been featured on Radio NZ Storytime Treasure Chest, where is has been read aloud by Diana Noonan. Click here to be directed to the Radio NZ website and listen to the book.

08
Feb
2011

Traumatic Loss in Children and Adolescents

Source: Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma, 2011 Vol 4 (1)

This article details the characteristics that are specific to traumatic loss in children and adolescents, and distinguishes this from the characteristics present following other childhood traumas.

01
Sep
2010

An integration of theory, science and reflective clinical practice in the care and management of attachment-disordered children: a triple-A approach

Source: Educational and Child Psychology

This article discusses attachment and proposes an approach to care and management of children with attachment difficulties

16
Jul
2010

The kids aren't alright - Medical Observer

Source:

"The Australian Child & Adolescent Trauma, Loss & Grief Network (ACATLGN) estimates that one in five under-15s faces at least three major parental and familial adversities. Twenty-eight per cent of children, for example, live in a household where at least one parent has a long-term mental illness, 24% experience financial hardship, and 16.5% have experienced the death of a close relative in the past year."

17
May
2010

Emerging themes in Aboriginal child and adolescent mental health: Findings from a qualitative study in Sydney, New South Wales

Source: MJA

Study finds that a strong sense of identity as an Aboriginal person is critical for mental health of young people. Participants also felt that family relationships are more significant than those with peers or others.

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